Cat Vaccinations

Some people don’t realise that kittens and cats need regular vaccinations just like puppies and dogs do. By getting routine vaccinations for your feline companions will greatly reduced their risk of getting several feline diseases.

A kitten should be vaccinated around nine weeks old and a second round of vaccinations should be given at 12 weeks. Then they should have a booster vaccination yearly. These regular boosters will give your cat protection against cat “flu”, feline parvovirus and feline leukemia.

Below are some of the diseases and vaccinations that your cat should have to keep them healthy and fit.

Feline infectious enteritis also known as FIE is a severe and often fatal internal infection. It is caused by feline parvovirus and this type of vaccination has been very successful in preventing this condition. This is a widespread disease and unvaccinated cats are at high risk of developing this disease.

Cat “flu” has two types of vaccinations which are to prevent feline herpesvirus also known as FHV-1 and feline calicivirus (FCV). These vaccinations help protect your cat from prolonged illness caused by the different kinds of “flu” that are commonly seen in your area.

Feline leukemia virus also known as FeLV vaccination is a must if your cat goes outdoors. It is not an airborn disease and can only be passed on via direct contact between cats. This disease is a lifelong infection which is usually fatal. It is very important to protect your cats from this very serious disease.

Feline chlamydophilosis causes conjunctivitis in cats. It is spread by direct contact between cats. If you have a multi-cat household or have kittens you should ask your vet if your cats should be vaccinated for this.

Once your cat has been vaccinated or receives a booster shot, you will be given a certificate stating that your cat has been vaccinated and for what. You should keep this certificate in a safe place and take it with you when you get your cat its yearly booster shots. Many animal boarding places won’t allow your feline companion to stay unless you have a certificate verifying they have up-to-date vaccinations.

Another thing to remember is that you should de-worm and use some type of flea application regularly on your cat. Depending on which products you choose to use will depend on how often you will need to do this. If you are unsure, ask your vet for suggestions on products to use and how often.

The average lifespan of a healthy indoor cat is 15 years. You might want to consider getting pet insurance on your cat or kitten incase their will be any unforeseen medical expenses in the years to come. You have health insurance on the rest of your family and for peace of mind you might want to consider getting cat insurance on your feline friend.

Ben Hewitt is a freelance author writes articles on pet insurance, pet insurance cover. To learn more about cheap pet insurance and cat insurance please visit www.animalfriends.org.uk

About the Author

Ben Hewitt is a freelance author writes articles on pet insurance, pet insurance cover. To learn more about cheap pet insurance and cat insurance please visit www.animalfriends.org.uk